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Ugh... self-reviews...

I hate self-reviews. I always feel like if I rate myself "too high" that I'm just being boastful or that maybe other people (like my boss) might feel differently. And if I rate myself "too low" then I worry that I'm just being modest and selling myself short -- which isn't fair to myself.

I usually end up tending towards being a little modest (at least when it comes to strict scale ratings). But I've been trying to work on not underestimating and undercutting myself so much, as I've had a history of doing. And now that it's coming up on review time, and I'm having to fill out my self-review, that internal struggle is really raging!

Does anyone else have to do self-reviews? Do you find it difficult to rate yourself fairly and objectively? Or are you pretty comfortable with tooting your own horn/discussing your shortcomings?

 

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Lilypie Maternity tickers

Re: Ugh... self-reviews...

  • We don't have self reviews, but we do have this rating system called "subjective points."  We get subjective points by doing something above and beyond our typical jobs...overhead tasks, hosting seminars, etc.  Subjective points play into the year end bonuses, etc.

    Each quarter the principals want us to fill out these forms basically tooting our own horns to remind them what we do that would qualify for these points.  I HATE doing it (and actually, to my detriment, I usually don't).  What if what I think is "going above and beyond" really isn't?  I'd rather just do everything and fly under the radar than to have to specifically point out why I'm a stellar star.  

    Lilypie Third Birthday tickers Lilypie Second Birthday tickers Lilypie First Birthday tickers
  • Yes. I pimp myself as much as I can! Nobody else is going to do it for me. I view it as my chance to remind them of how great I am, something that can easily be overlooked in a busy workplace. Never say anything negative in a self review. Your co-workers aren't.

    Sounds like yours is ratings based though? Mine is just a narrative, though I do try to quantify accomplishments with numbers (say how many times I've done something, or if it's something I do a lot more of, quantify it in a percentage increase).

    Don't worry about being modest. You know your pig-headed male colleagues aren't.

    My favorite place on earth: The Amargosa Valley.
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  • We don't do self reviews, but I also am not in a job that could really be called a career yet. I have no problem, however, reminding my bosses about good things I do if I think it will help them make important decisions, like giving me more hours (which happened and helped recently).

    Dani-you're awesome! Toot that horn! 

  • imagePassanie:

    Yes. I pimp myself as much as I can! Nobody else is going to do it for me. I view it as my chance to remind them of how great I am, something that can easily be overlooked in a busy workplace. Never say anything negative in a self review. Your co-workers aren't.

    Don't worry about being modest. You know your pig-headed male colleagues aren't.

    I totally agree with Passanie, especially the bolded parts. You're not going to get fired for being proud of your work and reminding people how valuable you are.  This is a chance to sell yourself in a well-thought out, written format.  Take advantage of it!

    If you don't make it clear that you think you do a damn good job, why should your bosses think any differently?

    I'd rather be rock climbing or playing volleyball
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  • imagePassanie:

    Don't worry about being modest. You know your pig-headed male colleagues aren't.

    This is really something I need to remind myself of more. I recall discussing this very thing back in one of my Anthro classes at Cal. We talked about how males in our culture/society have been raised to use more direct, aggressive and self-promoting language, whereas women tend to speak in less direct terms that are "softer" and leave more room for other opinions, or challenges to their thinking (e.g. men will state something as fact, even if it's just an opinion, as opposed to  women who are more likely to say "I feel..." or "I believe..." when giving discussing their knowledge/opinions so they don't step on other people's toes too much). We discussed how women who learn to "speak like a man" tend to be more successful in the corporate world.

    You guys are right that I should "toot my own horn". I know what my strengths and weaknesses are, better than my boss or other colleagues. And if I learn that they feel differently, then perhaps that means there's a lack of consensus on expectations that can then be addressed and corrected.

    Thanks, ladies!

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    Lilypie Maternity tickers

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