October 2009 Weddings
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US Citizenship

IYO, do you think someone who never plans to live in the US should be granted US citizenship?  Post your initial reaction, ask questions later.

Matt loves Munkii!!!

Re: US Citizenship

  • I can't react because I'm confused. Why would someone who doesn't plan on living in the US want citizenship?
  • I'd like to know the answer to that as well.  Without having that answer, my initial reaction is no.  However, maybe I'm not seeing something.  That's why I ask.
    Matt loves Munkii!!!
  • I'm pretty sure that US citizens living abroad file US taxes, don't they?
  • Initial response without knowing anything... no, citizenship shouldn't be granted.  Also, that's weird.
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  • Yes, they file taxes; however, there are benefits such as foreign income exclusion.  Also, if they pay certain social taxes, they may not have to pay those here (i.e. social security, fica). 
    Matt loves Munkii!!!
  • So would this be the same as someone moving to the US, planning on staying forever and not wanting to give up their citizenship to their "motherland" (for lack of a better word)? In that case, I don't see what the harm is in it.

    I think one of the main reasons why someone would want to keep their citizenship to a country that they do not live in is because it makes it easier to travel there and to have extended stays there. For example, most of the people I work with are Chinese citizens, and every time one of their parents wants to visit for longer than a couple weeks they have to go through this rigorous visa application. But when my CWs go back to China, they don't have to do that because they're chinese citizens. This is the only reason I can think of.  

  • Still thinking this through...

    A lot of countries put a cap on immigration so that the country can keep up with the physical needs of both its current and immigrant  population.  (Over populating is never a good thing.) So if you have people who are US citizens and they want to pay US taxes but not use US resources by living here... it sounds to me like "free money," if you know what I mean.  It's like someone saying they want to pay rent and have the rights for your home... but they're not going to ever be there.  Would you say no to that?

    So it's a little shady way of getting money and restrict overpopulation... but as long as the US citizen living abroad is aware that they still have to pay taxes... I don't know that there's a problem with it.

  • Situationally dependent.  I have cousins who were born in Switzerland to US parents so they have dual citizenship.  Granted they're back in the states now but I don't think that they should have had to forego their US citizenship simply because they were born in another country and might not have come back to the States.
  • imagemunkii:

    IYO, do you think someone who never plans to live in the US should be granted US citizenship?  Post your initial reaction, ask questions later.

    So the intital question was do I think someone who never plans to live in the US should be granted US citizenship?  Intital response....No.  If you are NOT going to live here, why should you get citizenship? 

  • imageKaren2905:

    Still thinking this through...

    A lot of countries put a cap on immigration so that the country can keep up with the physical needs of both its current and immigrant  population.  (Over populating is never a good thing.) So if you have people who are US citizens and they want to pay US taxes but not use US resources by living here... it sounds to me like "free money," if you know what I mean.  It's like someone saying they want to pay rent and have the rights for your home... but they're not going to ever be there.  Would you say no to that?

    So it's a little shady way of getting money and restrict overpopulation... but as long as the US citizen living abroad is aware that they still have to pay taxes... I don't know that there's a problem with it.

    This is a good way of looking at it.

    Here's the story.  Someone (I cannot disclose if I know or not) is currently a permanent resident of the US.  She is married to a US citizen.  They moved to China about three years ago, and six months later moved in with her parents in Taiwan.  Over the past 2.5 years, she and her husband have been working in Taiwan and living with her parents.  They also run their own law firm.  Recently, they confirmed they will be shipping their stuff from the states to Taiwan to live permanently.  She (the almost citizen) is also pregnant but plans to give birth there not here. 

    Coming from a family with immigrants, I initially say no she should not be granted citizenship as it is not something that is handed over easily--even getting permanent resident status or a visa is something that not all nationalities are given equal access to.  If everyone was given equal access, this situation wouldn't bother me...but, the inequalities exist.  This, of course, puts a bad taste in my mouth.  However, looking at it from the paying rent without living there POV, that makes it easier to swallow.

    Matt loves Munkii!!!
  • imagewittyschaffy:
    Situationally dependent.  I have cousins who were born in Switzerland to US parents so they have dual citizenship.  Granted they're back in the states now but I don't think that they should have had to forego their US citizenship simply because they were born in another country and might not have come back to the States.
    That's different.  This person was not born here, married a citizen, and has no plans to live here.  Children of expats/military members are completely different.
    Matt loves Munkii!!!
  • My initial reaction, without knowing any additional details, is no BUT I will say that before my grandfather passed away last year I had thought about applying for dual citizenship for US/Canada (my grandfather was born a Canadian citizen and had dual citizenship, moved to the US in the late 1950's, but lived there for the last 25 years or so of his life. He would have been my sponsor).

    I probably would have moved to Canada at some point, but would have stayed in the US for the time being. I really wanted to travel on a Canadian passport (less restrictions and better treatment abroad), and it also has to do with my heritage and, now that my grandfather has passed away, I have very little physical connection left to the country aside from great aunts and uncles. I think having that citizenship would have kept me better connected to a country I love so much.

    ETA: I totally missed the explanation. In that case I feel like she should not be granted citizenship. Wouldn't that mean they are living illegally in Taiwan?

  • It means they're living on Visas in Taiwan.  I don't get it, but I won't be so hardcore against it now.
    Matt loves Munkii!!!
  • imagemunkii:
    It means they're living on Visas in Taiwan.  I don't get it, but I won't be so hardcore against it now.

    I actually think this is pretty common and goes both ways. There are lots of people I know from China, Taiwan, etc that are still citizens of their home country, but have lived in the states for the last 20 years. Who knows why people do it, but they do. 

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