Health & Fitness
Dear Community,

Our tech team has launched updates to The Nest today. As a result of these updates, members of the Nest Community will need to change their password in order to continue participating in the community. In addition, The Nest community member's avatars will be replaced with generic default avatars. If you wish to revert to your original avatar, you will need to re-upload it via The Nest.

If you have questions about this, please email [email protected]

Thank you.

Note: This only affects The Nest's community members and will not affect members on The Bump or The Knot.

Tell me about x country skiing...

When I was younger I did it a few times with my aunt & uncle and I enjoyed it. I live near Mt. Hood here in Oregon so getting to a place wouldn't be hard. I primarily run, but am swimming due to stress fracture UFN. So, Since it's been almost 20 years since I tried it I seriously can't remember anything... But I am intersted in getting into it. I have no interest in downhill skiing or going extremely fast.

 I was at REI today and I saw that the x country ski section is not in the same spot as some of the other skiing supplies. I see that there are poles, skis, binding, and shoes... Anything else?

 Any pros, cons, etc? I don't know anyone that does it and I am not sure of a good website resource to look for information...

Thanks as always!

Re: Tell me about x country skiing...

  • My advice is to first find a pair of boots that fit.  Then find bindings and skis that will work with those boots.  Comfortable XC boots are actually a little difficult to find for most people. 

    You said you run, so you should already have the necessary clothes.  You might want to invest in some good wool socks if you don't already have a pair.  Also glide wax. Most XC skis are considered "waxless," which means you don't have to hot wax them.  Glide wax is a cheap alternative - just rub it on, wait a minute, then buff it off with a rag.

  • You'll also need to decide whether you want to go with classic or skate skiis.  If you live near a xc area that gets groomed for both skate and classic, skate skiing is a better workout (IMO) - a little tougher to master though.  If you want to head out off groomed trails (i.e. on frozen snow covered lakes, fields, etc), classic is the way to go.  I have waxless classic skiis but am considering making the switch to skate.

    Waxless skiis are nice in terms of maintenance - no worries about figuring out what temperature the snow is and matching your wax to it - but definitely have their drawbacks.  When skiing with a group, I am usually in the lead powering up the uphill sections (better traction due to the "fishscale" pattern on the kick section of waxless skiis - waxed skiis get their traction from different waxes), but am trailing waaaaaay behind on the downhill.  They're also a lot louder on the snow than waxed skiis.

  • I would find out if there are any XC ski clubs in your area.  These are great for meeting people in the sport and also getting lessons.  As far as clothing, less is more; my favorite is Sporthill XC clothing. 
    Daisypath baby
  • I did a bit of xc skiing this winter and really enjoyed it.  My suggestion would be to look for a place that rents skis so you can try it out a few times to see if it is something you'll enjoy doing before spending the money to buy skis.

    I googled cross country ski rentals and my city name.  I was able to find several trails and a couple of places that rented. 

  • image puddlejumper:

    You'll also need to decide whether you want to go with classic or skate skiis.  If you live near a xc area that gets groomed for both skate and classic, skate skiing is a better workout (IMO) - a little tougher to master though.  If you want to head out off groomed trails (i.e. on frozen snow covered lakes, fields, etc), classic is the way to go.  I have waxless classic skiis but am considering making the switch to skate.

    Waxless skiis are nice in terms of maintenance - no worries about figuring out what temperature the snow is and matching your wax to it - but definitely have their drawbacks.  When skiing with a group, I am usually in the lead powering up the uphill sections (better traction due to the "fishscale" pattern on the kick section of waxless skiis - waxed skiis get their traction from different waxes), but am trailing waaaaaay behind on the downhill.  They're also a lot louder on the snow than waxed skiis.

    You probably need to get professionally fitted for your skis.  It sounds like you might be too advanced for those skis or the skis are for someone who's lighter.  If you have too much pressure on the camber, you won't go as fast on the downhills or flats.

    Daisypath baby
Sign In or Register to comment.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards