Health & Fitness
Dear Community,

Our tech team has launched updates to The Nest today. As a result of these updates, members of the Nest Community will need to change their password in order to continue participating in the community. In addition, The Nest community member's avatars will be replaced with generic default avatars. If you wish to revert to your original avatar, you will need to re-upload it via The Nest.

If you have questions about this, please email [email protected]

Thank you.

Note: This only affects The Nest's community members and will not affect members on The Bump or The Knot.

Runners - high mileage?

I've done 3 marathons with a PR of 3:46...and each time I peaked at about 50 mpw (one long run of 21 miles).

 I REALLY want to qualify for Boston and I'm considering a plan like Pfitzinger which gets up as high as 80-90 miles a week.  Obviously I'd build to that really gradually, but I'm just wondering if anyone has any experience with high mileage marathon plans and how they worked for you.

Thanks!

Food Blog: Cate's World Kitchen
Ellie Jane - 9/12/11
image
Post-partum races!
11/6 - Kennedy Drive 8K: 36:27 (7:20 pace)
12/4 - North Face Trail Half Marathon: 2:10 (9:27 pace)
12/11 - Arts and Sciences 5K: 21:56 (7:03 pace)
1/8 - Golden Gate Park 10K: 44:30 (7:09 pace) PR!
1/22 - Waterfront 5K: 20:54 (6:43 pace) PR!

Re: Runners - high mileage?

  • I have not yet run a marathon, but this is my experience and opinion of high miles.

    I'm not a fan of high mileage, but that's because my body can't handle it.  Too many weeks over 50 and I get hurt.

    If I were you, I would look for a plan that throws in some different types of long-intervals, hills, and speed training.  Maybe getting on a track for a few sessions.  

    I've also seen running more runs at your marathon pace.  

     

  • I'll let you know in about 10 years when I qualify!!
  • I have experience running that high of mileage. My personal experience is that once you go that high, you begin to walk a fine line between greatness and injury. You also start to run the risk of overtraining.  The qualifying time for Boston is 3:40 and you have a 3:46?

    My thinking is that a 30-40 mpw jump over a year is pretty big for a non-elite--non-expert runner, and you said you had run three marathons previously?  How LONG have you actually been running? Because the people that I know who got to that mileage had been running for well over 10 years at a high level of competition.

    My suggestion would be to work up to 60-65 mpw first, and work on intensifying your workouts first..a 6 min drop over 26 miles is not that huge of a drop, and you should be able to do it with a smaller mileage increase

    Just as a reference point, going from 50 MPW to 90 MPW, was/is the norm on a lot of collegiate teams--and it takes athletes between 2-3 years to reach that mileage--and racing is their job. 

     

  • I'm doing my third marathon on Saunday and for this marathon I reached the 50+ mileage only one week. I did 2 18s, 1 21 and 1 23 mile run. I feel ready for it but I am not sure about doing much more. Elites run 100+ miles a week...but they have the best of everything.

    I was able to run a half in Oct in 1:42 by incorporating the 3 essentials runs into my training each week. Maybe doing this (if you aren't already) will help you get faster without increasing mileage too much. I do a long run, a tempo run and a speed workout each week.

    If you are sure about the extra miles I would gradually increase...but I wouldn't jump from 50 to about 80 or 90 in a few months.

    imageimageimage
    Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker
  • Thanks for the input ladies!  I think I'll work up to 60ish... and I definitely need to incorporate more tempo runs so I will focus on that.

    Congrats on your half time, Christina_Diane! I would love to run a half that fast!

    Food Blog: Cate's World Kitchen
    Ellie Jane - 9/12/11
    image
    Post-partum races!
    11/6 - Kennedy Drive 8K: 36:27 (7:20 pace)
    12/4 - North Face Trail Half Marathon: 2:10 (9:27 pace)
    12/11 - Arts and Sciences 5K: 21:56 (7:03 pace)
    1/8 - Golden Gate Park 10K: 44:30 (7:09 pace) PR!
    1/22 - Waterfront 5K: 20:54 (6:43 pace) PR!
  •  

    I personally think an extremely high amount of miles is a recipe for injury.  I ran my first marathon in 3:26:49 and the most miles I ran in a week we around 40.  Focus on speed during your long runs and do lots of hills.  Overtraining (80-90 miles/week) just means you aren't properly rested at any point in your training.  GL.

  • image Lindsinjuly2:

    I'm not a fan of high mileage, but that's because my body can't handle it.  Too many weeks over 50 and I get hurt.

    If I were you, I would look for a plan that throws in some different types of long-intervals, hills, and speed training.  Maybe getting on a track for a few sessions.  

    I've also seen running more runs at your marathon pace.  

    Ditto. I used to run 50-60 miles a week and it took a toll on my body. I've qualified for Boston twice and increasing the quality of my mileage, not the quantity, made the real difference.

     

    <a href="http://www.lifeintheatl.blogspot.com">Follow me to AtlantaRunningMom.com</a><p><p><a href="http://marathonbars.com">Stay on. Keep on. - Team MARATHON Bars 2012</a><p><p>[IMG]http://i55.tinypic.com/14kd5r4.jpg[/IMG]<BR>[IMG]http://i1071.photobucket.com/albums/u501/lbellxc/NYCMarathonBadge-1.jpg[/IMG]
  • image chw57:

    Thanks for the input ladies!  I think I'll work up to 60ish... and I definitely need to incorporate more tempo runs so I will focus on that.

    Congrats on your half time, Christina_Diane! I would love to run a half that fast!

     

    Thanks and congrats to you to. I would love to run a full that fast. My PR is 4:24 and that is from March 2008. I think I am better at the short distances. (Short being 13.1 miles :)

    imageimageimage
    Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker
  • Check out the book "Run Less, Run Faster" which follows the FIRST training method.  It was published in conjunction with Runner's World mag, and while it does have a lot of "success stories" printed in it, I do think the program works for real.  I've been using it on some shorter runs and it REALLY helps.  The training runs are overall harder and more challenging, but since the mileage is lower, it has less impact on your body.  The FIRST method basically follows the "3+2" idea of 3 quality runs and 2 cross training sessions per week, with the 3 runs consisting of a track repeats day, a mid-length tempo run, and a long run.  They have marathon training programs specifically tailored for BQ'ing, too.
  • image laurel22:
    Check out the book "Run Less, Run Faster" which follows the FIRST training method.  It was published in conjunction with Runner's World mag, and while it does have a lot of "success stories" printed in it, I do think the program works for real.  I've been using it on some shorter runs and it REALLY helps.  The training runs are overall harder and more challenging, but since the mileage is lower, it has less impact on your body.  The FIRST method basically follows the "3+2" idea of 3 quality runs and 2 cross training sessions per week, with the 3 runs consisting of a track repeats day, a mid-length tempo run, and a long run.  They have marathon training programs specifically tailored for BQ'ing, too.

    That sounds perfect because I don't want to give up spinning and swimming!  I've read some good things about that as well as the Pfitz program that tops out at 55 miles per week... 

    Lots to think about! (I'm aiming for an early summer marathon)

    Food Blog: Cate's World Kitchen
    Ellie Jane - 9/12/11
    image
    Post-partum races!
    11/6 - Kennedy Drive 8K: 36:27 (7:20 pace)
    12/4 - North Face Trail Half Marathon: 2:10 (9:27 pace)
    12/11 - Arts and Sciences 5K: 21:56 (7:03 pace)
    1/8 - Golden Gate Park 10K: 44:30 (7:09 pace) PR!
    1/22 - Waterfront 5K: 20:54 (6:43 pace) PR!
  • Okay. I just have to say something here: I hear some...implied knocking of the running higher mileage. Running higher mileage=running faster. Every college kid in the nation is running higher milage along with high intensity workouts and that's how they run fast times. And the previous poster who said the comment about elites, that's true too.

    That has been shown many, many times. It comes with a risk of injury, and I wouldn't do it if I hadn't been running for a long time, knew what I was doing and wasn't under the advisement of a coach who also knew what they were doing. You have to know about periodization and the most important thing is--You have to know WHY you are doing it.

    If you have to run 90 miles a week to get run 3:40...it's NOT worth your time. Run 90 to try to run sub 3 and really put your heart, soul and legs into it--because you may only get to it once or twice.  

    But I guess my point is, higher mileage will result in faster times don't kid yourself into thinking it won't--but define your goals, run smart--and make sure that going there is the right choice for you as an individual. 

Sign In or Register to comment.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards