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Harris Benedict Equation question

I'm trying to figure out my daily calories to aim for while I'm wanting to lose weight.  If I want to eat back the actual calories I burn while working out (because I have a HRM and can accurately monitor that) then I should just chose sedentary or lightly active, right?

If I didn't have an HRM or an accurate way of measuring calories burned during a workout, I should chose the activity level that best matches what I do, right?

Just trying to make sure I've got this right in my head to explain to a friend.

Re: Harris Benedict Equation question

  • Both ways are fine.  Just make sure you don't calculate "moderately active" and ALSO add back in the calories you burn exercising.

    If you are going to use a HRM, I would go with what you typically think of as a "regular day" as your base (if you sit at a computer all day and don't get up except to pee, go with sedentary.  However, if you are constanly up walking around or standing and such, go with lightly active). 

    It seems like you've got it figured out though!

    image

    Bazinga!

    Liz's Yarn

  • It was my understanding that the activity level is how you are most of the day. I have a desk job, so even if I kill it at the gym 6 days a week, my activity level is sedentary. If you have a job that allows you to be on your feet most of the day, you get to pick one of the higher activity levels.

     *I think I got this from a Jillian Michaels youtube lecture. 

  • CBLCBL member
    image PunkinButter:

    It was my understanding that the activity level is how you are most of the day. I have a desk job, so even if I kill it at the gym 6 days a week, my activity level is sedentary. If you have a job that allows you to be on your feet most of the day, you get to pick one of the higher activity levels.

     *I think I got this from a Jillian Michaels youtube lecture. 

    This isn't how I interpreted it at all and not how it was explained by my registered dietician either.  Moderately active for example is explained as engaging in moderate activity 3-5 times a week, not engaging in moderate activity all day every day.

  • image CBL:
    image PunkinButter:

    It was my understanding that the activity level is how you are most of the day. I have a desk job, so even if I kill it at the gym 6 days a week, my activity level is sedentary. If you have a job that allows you to be on your feet most of the day, you get to pick one of the higher activity levels.

     *I think I got this from a Jillian Michaels youtube lecture. 

    This isn't how I interpreted it at all and not how it was explained by my registered dietician either.  Moderately active for example is explained as engaging in moderate activity 3-5 times a week, not engaging in moderate activity all day every day.

    Agree with CBL. This is what I was told by a dietician as well.  

    image
    The face of Kitty-Hate
  • I think the confusion is because it says "If you are moderatetely active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week)" but the last option says "If you are extra active (very hard exercise/sports & physical job or 2x training)" it throws in that bit about your job.

    I've seen some calorie calculators ask for your daily activity level as it relates to your job, not just exercise, which can be confusing as well.

     

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