Gardening & Landscaping
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Why are tulips growing that I didn't plant?

DH and I had our from yard professionally landscaped last spring - they pulled out ALL plants, mulch, dirt etc and put in new shrubs/flowers.  Tulips were NOT part of the plan and no tulip bulbs got planted.

I looked out the front window and there's probably 40 tulip stems that are starting to pop up - they're about 4 inches tall right now. 

We had "stink horns" towards the end of summer last year in the mulch that turned orange in color but I'm not sure that's what this is.  I pulled one of these out and there's clearly a bulb on the bottom. 

Suggestions?  I should mention that none of my neighboors have these.  I live in VA and we had literally NO winter this year. 

Re: Why are tulips growing that I didn't plant?

  • Bulbs are buried several inches deep.  Your landscapers had no way of knowing they were there if they weren't in bloom.  They're flowers, they're lovely, enjoy them.  (Unless they're onions, which means an hour of labor for you to pull them all up.)
  • I'm sure there are bulbs deep down there and I would be overjoyed to see that man tulips unexpectedly popping up! I love tulips!!! I went to Holland in April just to see tulips!
  • No winter doesn't mean no tulips, fwiw.

    Are you sure they are tulips vs. wild onions (aka weed?).  Also, squirrels have been known to plant or move bulbs around my yard.

    If you don't want them & don't want to dig them up, just keep the foliage trimmed down.  If they can't store energy this year, I don't think they could pop up next year.

  • I feel like this is the gardening equivalent of "my diamond shoes are too tight."
    image

    "The meek shall inherit the earth" isn't about children. It's about deer. We're all going to get messed the fuckup by a bunch of cloned super-deer.- samfish2bcrab

    Sometimes I wonder if scientists have never seen a sci-fi movie before. "Oh yes, let's create a super species of deer. NOTHING COULD POSSIBLY GO WRONG." I wonder if State Farm offers a Zombie Deer Attack policy. -CaliopeSpidrman
  • image pdxmouse:
    I feel like this is the gardening equivalent of "my diamond shoes are too tight."

    LOL.

  • You don't have to have a real winter for tulips as the PP's stated - your ground just needs to freeze and you need to get below freezing temps for more than 8 weeks - and I'm sure DC had at least those temps this winter and for that long.

    As they come up, can  you dig them up?  Or will that destroy the work of the landscapers? If you want to ensure that they don't come back next year, you will have to dig them up or they WILL come back.  Eventually they will die out and thin out but that would take years and it sounds like you have quite a few. 

  • image +j+k+:

    You don't have to have a real winter for tulips as the PP's stated - your ground just needs to freeze and you need to get below freezing temps for more than 8 weeks - and I'm sure DC had at least those temps this winter and for that long.

    Not true.  We have tulips here and we had less than a week of nights below 32?.  Our winter's been in the 50s and 60s and it's 74 here today.  Our tulips are happy as clams.  Maybe certain varieties need cold, but it is not a blanket requisite, and certainly not for 8 weeks.

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