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NBR: job dilemma (long)

Many of you know that I'm a sexual assault counselor for a rape crisis center.  I started here in September 2007.  I was originally just an intern but was given the job of volunteer coordinator.  In that position, I was in charge of training and managing the volunteers for our program.  Training consists of 40 hours to become certified sexual assault counselor.  In December 2007, I was asked to pick up the job of legal advocate.  I began accompanying survivors to legal interviews and court proceedings.  At this point, I was working two positions but only part-time.  In June 2008, I began my counselor duties.  I started to see clients (children and adults).  I was finally made full-time in July 2008.  From July 2008- August 2010, I was working three positions.  Some changes were made in August that allowed me to be the only full-time counselor.  This means I only have one job title, but as the only full-time counselor, I get most of the clients.

My dilemma is that I want to find a new job, but I'm 6 months pregnant.  I'm miserable at this job.  I hate coming here every day.  I've found some other jobs that I could apply for, but I'm afraid I'll be turned down since I'm pregnant.  Who would want to hire someone who would work for a few months and then be off for a few months?  I have definitely decided to find a new job after the baby is born.  I could easily be making more money if I went somewhere else, and we'll need the extra money.  DH wants me to start applying now.

I'm torn.  Should I start applying now even though I'm 6 months pregnant?  Or should I stick it out until I have the baby?  Any thoughts?  Suggestions?  TIA! 

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Re: NBR: job dilemma (long)

  • I would say to try to stick it out until you have the baby...and then during your maternity leave, go on a couple of interviews.  It sucks, but the sad truth of it is that they know you're going to be out of the office for 6-8 weeks after the baby is born, so they would train you to lose you and you'd be discriminated against.  It's not right, but it's the truth.  I know exactly how you feel though.  I was in the same sort of situation when my child was born.  I had to stick it out. 

    Good luck on whatever you decide to do though!

     "Live like there's no midnight."

  • image katienichols08:

    I would say to try to stick it out until you have the baby...and then during your maternity leave, go on a couple of interviews.  It sucks, but the sad truth of it is that they know you're going to be out of the office for 6-8 weeks after the baby is born, so they would train you to lose you and you'd be discriminated against.  It's not right, but it's the truth.  I know exactly how you feel though.  I was in the same sort of situation when my child was born.  I had to stick it out. 

    Good luck on whatever you decide to do though!

    Thanks!  This is my biggest reason for wanting to wait, especially with my type of job.  I can't imagine wanting to set clients up with a therapist they would see for a few months and then having to switch them to someone new for a few months until their original therapist comes back.

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  • EliStarEliStar member
    Ninth Anniversary 10000 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    image denmanam:
    image katienichols08:

    I would say to try to stick it out until you have the baby...and then during your maternity leave, go on a couple of interviews.  It sucks, but the sad truth of it is that they know you're going to be out of the office for 6-8 weeks after the baby is born, so they would train you to lose you and you'd be discriminated against.  It's not right, but it's the truth.  I know exactly how you feel though.  I was in the same sort of situation when my child was born.  I had to stick it out. 

    Good luck on whatever you decide to do though!

    Thanks!  This is my biggest reason for wanting to wait, especially with my type of job.  I can't imagine wanting to set clients up with a therapist they would see for a few months and then having to switch them to someone new for a few months until their original therapist comes back.

    I agree with Katie. I know it may seem like a lifetime, especially since you're so miserable, but three months is really not that long in the grand scheme of things. You're going to be wasting your time if you start searching now. :( Sorry! 


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  • Yeah, that would mess up the continuity of care. 

     "Live like there's no midnight."

  • MrsC7MrsC7 member
    Seventh Anniversary 5000 Comments 500 Love Its Name Dropper

    Hi, I'm the voice of dissent. Stick out tongue

    I say start looking now.  Poke the field a little bit and see how much competition is out there.  If you DO land an interview, you don't have to take it.  But at least you'll know what you're up against and how you stand up to the crowd.

    I don't know what your job market is like but mine is so saturated with applicants that submitting a thousand resumes and getting one interview call-back is pretty much the norm.  You could be searching for months; or you could be lucky and get luck into something you really love.  The right employer may even let you start after your maternity leave ends.

    ETA: Alternatively, have you talked with your boss about how overworked you are?  Can you share your workload?  Or ask for more help to be hired?

     

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  • RevJenRevJen member
    Ninth Anniversary 25000 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer

    From an HR standpoint, you probably won't be able to start something new until after the baby anyway.  You'll have to apply, then interview, then go through the background checks.  It's going to bring you right up to when you'll go out on leave. 

    You would also lose your FMLA protection since you'll be starting over at a new company.  One of the provisions of the FMLA is that employees who work at their company for 1 year or longer automatically receive job protection of a sort.  You may not get your exact position but your company is required to hold a job for you at your same level of pay.  In your case, you don't seem like you would regret a job change for the same pay.

    Use the leave time to look for something new.  It happens all the time.  In an ideal world, give your notice before you go if you can afford to stay home and look for something new.  It's common courtesy and you never know when you may have to work with someone from a past job in the future.


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  • I completely agree with what Rev posted. I know you're miserable, but you only have a few months left. In the long scheme of things, it isn't all that much. Plus financially, what would happen if you quit now but couldn't find anything right away? In today's economy, that's VERY possible. Then you would be suffering financially and be in an even worse situation than having a job you hate.

    I hope it all works out for you, though! 

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  • MrsJenEMrsJenE member
    Seventh Anniversary 5000 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    I was going to say the same thing as Rev.  You only have three months left.  There's a light at the end of the tunnel.
    75 Books in 2015?
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    It's slippery as waterweed.
  • Check with a lawyer before you give your current position any sort of notice that you might not return from maternity leave. I haven't practiced law in forever and don't have all of the FMLA stuff memorized, but FMLA only applies to employers of a certain size and I believe that it is possible that if they know you aren't returning you open yourself up to other problems.
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  • Thanks ladies!  I think I'm going to suck it up and stick around for another 3 months.  I've narrowed my options down to quitting right before I have the baby or quitting after I come back from maternity leave.  We already have 3 months of my salary saved up for when I won't get paid during maternity leave.  We'll need that no matter what my decision is.  In the meantime, I'll be looking for jobs and doing a bit of research on local organizations.  I'll probably apply for jobs right before I have the baby or right after I have the baby.  That will allow me to do job interviews while I'm on maternity leave.  My main concerns are not having insurance (right now I'm on my own, not my husband's), having to use money from our savings, and not being able to find a job fast enough.  Like I said, we have a maternity savings set aside and also have a regular savings.  I'd prefer to not have to dip into that.

    I think the next few months will be rough, especially since I've just gotten a bunch of new clients.  You ladies will just have to help keep me sane.  Stick out tongue

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