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American Humane Certified dairy?

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(XP from EFF) 

We are moving back to Louisiana soon. I have been looking for a local dairy that is organic but have been unable to find one. The big local dairy, however, does not use rBGH and has been awarded the American Humane Certified award (perfect score last 2 yrs in a row).

Does anybody know about this certification - does it really mean much/hold much weight regarding how the cows are treated? Is there anything else I need to be looking for?

I don't know much about organic milk...but some of the reading I have done recently about the big "organic" milk providers like Horizon sounds sketchy - they have been condemned for "corporate" practices, etc. I like the idea of supporting the local dairy (it's a pretty big operation - not a little dairy by any means) - but want to be sure my dollars are going to support a business that treats their animals well.

Thoughts?

Re: American Humane Certified dairy?

  • I am pretty sure that's a really good thing. I think it is a hard rating to get.
  • rBGH is a shot given to cows to produce more milk. 

    rBGH (recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone) is a genetically engineered variant of the natural growth hormone produced by cows. Manufactured by Monsanto, it is sold to dairy farmers under the trade name Posilac. Injection of this hormone forces cows to boost milk production by about 10%, while increasing the incidences of mastitis, lameness, and reproductive complications.

    Someone tell me please -- how does rBGH control non-organic feed and grazing pastures.

  • image clea:

    rBGH is a shot given to cows to produce more milk. 

    rBGH (recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone) is a genetically engineered variant of the natural growth hormone produced by cows. Manufactured by Monsanto, it is sold to dairy farmers under the trade name Posilac. Injection of this hormone forces cows to boost milk production by about 10%, while increasing the incidences of mastitis, lameness, and reproductive complications.

    Someone tell me please -- how does rBGH control non-organic feed and grazing pastures.

    I don't understand this statement/question.

    Are you annoyed that I included in my original post that this dairy does not use rBGH? My main concern is the ethical treatment of the dairy cows - so I included that they don't use rBGH because I think that is better for the cows. I thought that may have a bearing on the certification I mentioned.

    Sorry if I am misinterpreting your post. I appreciate your information about rBGH.

  • I think I'm confused about rBGH and organic.  They are two different unrelated things, right?

    Someone help me please....

  • image clea:
    I think I'm confused about rBGH and organic.  They are two different unrelated things, right?

    Someone help me please....

    Honestly, i know almost nothing about it, but i do know enough to say that they are related: treating cows with the growth hormone excludes them from organic status.

    I'm thinking there is more to what you said/asked before and what you are asking now, but i'm not really sure what (i.e., organic feed, free-range/pasturing, treatment, etc.)...

    EDD 9/24/13 BabyFetus Ticker
    Best sound ever: baby's heartbeat! (Heard @ 10w1d)
  • Reading a bit about it I found that the USDA organic label encompases this:

    Current rules require milk marketed as organic to come from cows whose feed was grown without chemical fertilizers, pesticides or genetically modified seeds. Herds can't be treated with hormones or antibiotics.

    I think that within the past year they also extended that to cows having at least 120 days/yr in a pasture.

    So no rBGH use would be one factor (i.e. no hormones) but not enough by itself to certify a production as organic.

     

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