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Cookout/honoring military

Morning!

DH and I are having a cookout at our house this weekend for the holiday. We are doing just your normal burgers, hot dogs, salads etc. But the more I think about it the more I think we should some how acknowledge my dad and DH's dad for their service in the Vietnam War- that is the point of the holiday after all. Both dads will be at the cookout. I don't want to hang banners that say "Thank You!", but I also don't want the day to pass by and not let them know we ARE thankful for what they did for our country. Any ideas on how to pay tribute without making it awkward or too forward?

Re: Cookout/honoring military

  • How about a simple toast when the food is served?
  • image Karen2905:
    How about a simple toast when the food is served?

    I think this would be a great idea!

  • You could also play the National Anthem or America the Beautiful before/after the toast.  

    You could setup  a donation jar in a corner for a local veteran charity to collect funds for the charity. One quick mention of it is all that would be needed (don't walk around shoving the jar in people's faces).

    Your recognition could be as simple as the toast or as elaborate as a full on battle reenactment. The important thing is that you have some sort of remembrance.

     

  • image BunMom90:

    Your recognition could be as simple as the toast or as elaborate as a full on battle reenactment. The important thing is that you have some sort of remembrance.

     

     

    My husband is 1 of 5 boys... this might be doable! Stick out tongue

  • I think that honoring them is such a sweet idea! However, I would run whatever you decide by them first. My dad served in Vietnam and it's still really hard and upsetting for him to talk about. I think he would be really uncomfortable being honored in front of all those people (even though I know he deserves it!). I'm sure you know your family and what they would be comfortable with, but just wanted to put that out there.
  • I agree that you  may want to talk to them first and make sure it won't be an issue.  DH had an uncle that served in Korea and was a POW for a couple of years.  One 4th of July, I went over to him in private and shook his hand, simply said thank you for my freedom and my children's freedom, and for going through what he did, and while I know it meant a lot to him, he said as much, it also brought him to tears and that followed with embarrasment.  Now, I know being a POW would stir up a lot more feelings and memories, so it is not really 100% the same, you might want to feel them out first.  No one really knows what they went through.

     If it would be a problem for them, does your family ever attend any services at a local cemetary?  Maybe you could all do that together, get the sentimental part over and done with, so everyone could enjoy an afternoon together afterwards.  Just a thought. 

    Either way, it is refreshing to see people remembering the day for what it is about.  I work in an office of 22 people, and last year, not one person other than myself went to a ceremony, and some people didn't even know ceremonies existed!!  Sad.

  • I think the dessert gives you a good opportunity to mark the occassion.  Like a red, white and blue sheet cake with a "thank you veterans' message in icing. 

    Who doesn't like cake?

    My darling daughter just turned 4 years old.
  • image Kristianne48:

    I agree that you  may want to talk to them first and make sure it won't be an issue.  DH had an uncle that served in Korea and was a POW for a couple of years.  One 4th of July, I went over to him in private and shook his hand, simply said thank you for my freedom and my children's freedom, and for going through what he did, and while I know it meant a lot to him, he said as much, it also brought him to tears and that followed with embarrasment.  Now, I know being a POW would stir up a lot more feelings and memories, so it is not really 100% the same, you might want to feel them out first.  No one really knows what they went through.

    This. Whenever I see someone in uniform or something, I also ask if they are/were in the services. If they say yes, I ALWAYS shake their hand and thank them for their service. I'm always amazed at how many of them get embarrassed about it. A lot of them THANK ME because they say they don't get that a lot. How sad :(

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