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Remember my neighbor who surrendered the Doberman? *vent*

They are getting a puppy from the Humane Society tomorrow. The same Humane Society they sent the Doberman to. (At least, he was supposed to go to the Humane Society. They sent him to AC, as I remember it, and we told he'd go to the Humane Society. I've been watching their site; he still hasn't shown up as adoptable. )

Shouldn't they be on a "DO NOT ADOPT" list? Also, a puppy!? It's a "6 or 8 week old" puppy (in her words) too. If they thought the Doberman was a lot of work wait until they start dealing with puppy sh!t. Literally. 

On a non-hating-them note, they couldn't pick her up today because she's getting spayed tomorrow. Is it normal for shelters to spay that young? I understand that they want to ensure that the dog gets altered, but isn't that incredibly bad for the dog's health? Can't they do like the rescues and write it into the adoption contract so the dog can get to be much older before they spay?

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Re: Remember my neighbor who surrendered the Doberman? *vent*

  • I know the humane society by me spays, no matter the age of the dog. I don't know if they do it as soon as they get a dog or when they have someone who is going to adopt 'em but that might depend on age. I do know I saw a young puppy (12-16 weeks old I think) that was definitely already spayed.
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  • Our big shelter does it that young. No, it's probably not great for the dogs, but if it means they euthanize fewer of them a year, I doubt the shelter is too worried about it.
  • Cady came from the humane society and their reasoning was that they couldn't adopt out until they were spayed and the longer they stay in the shelter the more likely they are to be sick. At the HS where she came from, they do boys at 7-8 weeks and girls at 14-15 weeks. It's obviously preferable if someone can foster them until that time but a lot of times they don't have enough fosters so they do what they can to expedite adoptions. A lot of shelter's have problems with spay/neuter contracts and the owner never brings them back to follow up with their end of the bargain, so it's really the only way to 100% ensure that the pet will be spayed. It might be easier with smaller rescues to make sure that happened but the HS we deal with is the only non-kill in this area and because of that the sheer volume of pups they save would make it nearly impossible to follow up on all of them in terms of overhead costs.

    In addition, while some may not agree, there's been growing research that supports the early spay/neuter process and if done right there are little side affects. So far, we've had no problems but I think her vet was EXTREMELY experienced. Her incision is about a fourth of an inch long and even the regular vet was impressed with the HS's vet skills. I doubt that Cady has experienced any growth issues because of it as she's 20 1/2 weeks and already weighs 35 lbs.
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  • dusk42dusk42 member
    Ancient Membership Combo Breaker

    Pediatric speutering is a very good way to ensure compliance and mitigate the risk of shelter pets reproducing and contributing to the overpopulation problem.  Most of our shelters do pediatric spays, and they can be done safely.  
     
    However, your neighbors suck.  :( 
     
  • I would call the AC and HS and inquire about the doberman. I would then call the HS and remind them they just dumped a dog and should not be allowed to adopt. I don't know what your policies are, but that's asinine and I'd be letting someone know. I would not like to think they have somehow circumvented a do not adopt list should one exist. Be the squeaky wheel.

     

  • dusk42dusk42 member
    Ancient Membership Combo Breaker
    image PittieBoo:

    I would call the AC and HS and inquire about the doberman. I would then call the HS and remind them they just dumped a dog and should not be allowed to adopt. I don't know what your policies are, but that's asinine and I'd be letting someone know. I would not like to think they have somehow circumvented a do not adopt list should one exist. Be the squeaky wheel.

    This is true - I guarantee that except for the crappiest NC shelters, the HS and shelters all ask if you have ever given up a dog before and will potentially deny an adoption.  People lie all the time about this, so I would call them on it.   

  • I called. I feel kinda bad about possibly denying someone a dog but she just posted a picture of it (from a website, it doesn't seem like she has it yet) and it looks like a Pittie Mix to me. If she surrenders this one it's chances of being readopted are cut drastically and they already weren't high to begin with. 

    The volunteer I spoke with was very kind and concerned, so I felt like I was doing the right thing. 

    image Visit The Nest! PitaPata Dog tickers
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