International Nesties
Dear Community,

Our tech team has launched updates to The Nest today. As a result of these updates, members of the Nest Community will need to change their password in order to continue participating in the community. In addition, The Nest community member's avatars will be replaced with generic default avatars. If you wish to revert to your original avatar, you will need to re-upload it via The Nest.

If you have questions about this, please email help@theknot.com.

Thank you.

Note: This only affects The Nest's community members and will not affect members on The Bump or The Knot.

Non military wives living abroad

Hi! I just wanted to see if there were any other wives that moved abroad to be with foreign husbands. Thought it would be nice sharing tips and stories about adapting and building a home in new cultures. 
Anniversary

Re: Non military wives living abroad

  • I'm not a military wife, but H and I are both Americans. We live and work in Italy.
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  • Hey there. Where are you living?

    I'm a Canadian married to a Canadian, but we live in the UK as expats. 

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    Chronically hilarious - you'll split your stitches!
    I wrote a book! Bucket list CHECK!
  • Awesome! We are in the Reading, Berkshire area, you?
    Anniversary
  • I'm in South Ruislip, London.
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    Chronically hilarious - you'll split your stitches!
    I wrote a book! Bucket list CHECK!
  • I love Reading!  We're in Woking.  Btw, I'm an American, married to a Greek.  Go eat at Kebabish and get their mixed grill.  It's sooo yummy! :)
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  • Haven't seen that place! Is it in the town centre?
    Anniversary
  • Hi! I live in Bucks, not too far away from Reading. This board has been pretty quiet lately...glad to see more expats in this part of England! If you're ever in London, we do get-togethers from time to time.
  • I'm non-military. My husband teaches at a school in India, and I'm along for the ride. We're also a binational couple - he's Canadian, I'm American, and we're expecting a kidlet that will get dual citizenship, plus a PIO (Person of Indian Origin) card. Good times, with all this paperwork to come... :)
    #1: BFP 24/7/12 - MMC confirmed 28/8, D&E 29/8 #2: BFP 12/2/13 - fingers crossed! BabyFruit Ticker
  • Not a wife yet, 'just' a fiancée. FI is American, I'm from the Netherlands, and we live in South Sudan. We work for NGOs (non-religious), and will be here for another year. Apart from family and friends, what do you miss most from home?
  • GilliCGilliC
    Ancient Membership 5000 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    member
    edited April 2014
    Not a wife yet, 'just' a fiancée. FI is American, I'm from the Netherlands, and we live in South Sudan. We work for NGOs (non-religious), and will be here for another year. Apart from family and friends, what do you miss most from home?
    @Sonietsjka, You should post this as a new post! It would be nice to see a little more activity on this board. :)

    What is South Sudan like? I can't imagine! I've had some local friends here in Oslo who've worked in Rwanda, but I would think South Sudan is a few steps beyond that!
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  • @GilliC

    Made a new post! Let’s see if we can get people to respond.

     

    South Sudan is… different. Before December I would have said it’s great but then war broke out, people started killing each other, and we got evacuated, so that was less fun.

    It’s basically dirt poor. There are only about 15 paved roads in the capital, school systems are poor, there’s little health care, no sewage systems, no trash removal, no power. The whole country is in ruins after decades of war, and nothing works. There are supermarkets but many things are very expensive, and we’re quite deprived of some things (cheese!).

    I work for an NGO but sometimes I wonder what the f are we all still doing here? There’s so much to do that you almost don’t know where to start. We have rest and recuperation (R&R) every 12 weeks, and you really need that.  

    But the people are so nice! When you meet people it’s always ‘hi, how are you!?’. It’s one of the few countries in Africa where as a white person you are not considered a walking ATM machine, which is very pleasant. The weather is great, it’s nice and warm every day, and even when it rains, it’s still warm enough to wear shorts and a t-shirt. There isn’t much to do here, especially since we have 19.30 curfew, but there are nice restaurants (Thai, Indian, generic International), some of which are at the river, and lovely places to hang out.

    I think Rwanda would be more developed, and in some ways an easier place to live, but the genocide must still have an impact on the people, and I cannot imagine that being easy.  

    On the radio on the way to work I heard that today is the 20th ‘anniversary’ of the Rwandan genocide. Thank

     

  • Is this forum still active? I just found this place.

    I'm American, SO is Japanese. But we move around a lot. Darn this place looked really cool!
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