Decorating & Renovating
Dear Community,

Our tech team has launched updates to The Nest today. As a result of these updates, members of the Nest Community will need to change their password in order to continue participating in the community. In addition, The Nest community member's avatars will be replaced with generic default avatars. If you wish to revert to your original avatar, you will need to re-upload it via The Nest.

If you have questions about this, please email [email protected]

Thank you.

Note: This only affects The Nest's community members and will not affect members on The Bump or The Knot.

How often should one expect to update a kitchen? (PIP)

There was a post a couple days ago asking if their kitchen is outdated.  Everyone seemed to point at the cabinets as the reason.

Now, I'm afraid to choose the cabinets for the house.  Would they look outdated in 10yrs?  20 yrs?  With the cost of cabinets, it seems crazy to spend $$$ on cabinets that will become outdated.

Or, are there cabinet styles that would never look outdated?  LOL.  Assuming everyone answers "no," how often do you plan on updating your kitchen?  Smile

In case you are curious, here's my kitchen inspiration (maybe this is already an outdated kitchen????  LOL):

image

image 

Re: How often should one expect to update a kitchen? (PIP)

  • We're in the same boat so I'm really looking forward to hearing some answers. 
  • THAT kitchen is gorgeous.

    Bisque cabinets with a warm glaze are immensely popular right now, and have been the most popular for at least 10 years (according to every cabinet consultant I spoke with). You would be safe for at least a couple decades with that.

    [url=http://www.myfitnesspal.com/weight-loss-ticker][img]http://tickers.myfitnesspal.com/ticker/show/1877/160/18770160.png[/img][/url]
    Created by MyFitnessPal.com - [url=http://www.myfitnesspal.com]Free Calorie Counter[/url]
  • I kind of think white and darker woods won't ever really go out of style, but there is no way to really know.  I can't imagine oak ever coming back in.  If you plan on staying in this house for a while go with what you like.  If you like the white with a black island go with that.  I would think that look you are going for will be in for quite some time.
  • I'd say 15 years.

    There's no such thing as a timeless kitchen.  Period.  The end.  Styles change much too quickly, especially now in the internet age.

    White kitchens have been in for at least 6 years (that's when I first bought my house and first noticed), so I'll bet you $100 they're already out with high-end designers.  I think a warm, medium-dark wood will be next.  I especially think two-tone cabinetry, subway tile, and granite will date a kitchen to the mid-late '00s.

    So what's a homeowner to do?  Pick a kitchen you love. 

    FWIW, I think cabinets with square panels (Shaker style) are more classic than plain, unpaneled doors or cathedral arches.  Solid-colored countertops are more classic than anything speckled or veined, IMO.  When you drill for hardware, try to choose hardware with a common screw spread so that in X years you can easily find trendy replacements.

  • That kitchen is gorgeous and I don't see how it could ever go out of style. It's classic.

    As far updating, I think a lot depends on wear and tear and that depends on how well it's taken care of. We just moved into a house that is only 5 years old. I don't know what the previous owners did, but some of the cabinets are already scuffed and the edges worn. They only had one older child, so they can't blame her. It doesn't look too bad but it still annoys me. In our old house we had brand new maple cabinets when we moved in and 7 years later when we sold, they were still in perfect condition, even w/ 2 small kids and a dog.

    Also, it depends on the materials used. Something like a granite counter would last decades if properly sealed, right? Tile should also last a long, long time.

    My parents are just now renovating their 20 year old kitchen, but they had laminate counters and white builder grade cabinets and the original appliances from 1991. It looks badly worn.

  • My parent's 1974 ranch house (mid range price, tract housing subdivision) had dark wood cabinets that were out of style when they finally remodeled it in the late-90's and put in mid-tone oak cabinets (and carried them to the ceiling to fill in that weird empty area above the cabinets). While the cabinets are looking great and holding up really well, they may be considered dated by many, and they are only about 12 years old.

    Styles have changed so quickly in the last 10 years, and seem to change more quickly in a good economy when there is a market for such things. I say, if you are going to be in your house for awhile, pick something that you love and go with it.  When they aren't "in style" in 10, 15 or 20 years you may not have the money to remodel anyway.

    DS#1 - 8/2009
    CafeMom Tickers

    my read shelf:
    Cindy's book recommendations, liked quotes, book clubs, book trivia, book lists (read shelf)
  • I think we need to make a distinction between off-trend and dated.

    Something can be "not hot" right now without looking dated. 

    Example: white cabinets might not be "in" at the moment for the leading edge, but that in no way makes them dated.

    But honey oak cabinets are both off-trend AND dated. 

    Similar - I will argue till I'm blue in the face that white appliances are not dated.  Off trend?  Absolutely.  But not dated.  Almond appliances on the other hand - those suckers are dated.

    And now the word dated sounds like nonsense.  I've said it too many times in my head.  dated, dated, dated...

  • image wawajeanne:

    I think we need to make a distinction between off-trend and dated.

    Something can be "not hot" right now without looking dated. 

    Example: white cabinets might not be "in" at the moment for the leading edge, but that in no way makes them dated.

    But honey oak cabinets are both off-trend AND dated. 

    Similar - I will argue till I'm blue in the face that white appliances are not dated.  Off trend?  Absolutely.  But not dated.  Almond appliances on the other hand - those suckers are dated.

    And now the word dated sounds like nonsense.  I've said it too many times in my head.  dated, dated, dated...

    Very well said. I think it's tough to go wrong with basic white cabinets.

    My favorite place on earth: The Amargosa Valley.
    image
  • I think that a well-built kitchen with classic elements (solid cabinets, stone/solid surface counter tops, tile/wood floor) can be updated easily with paint, new backsplash, accessories, ect.  If the bones are in good shape it should be easy to make changes to keep it "on-trend".  However, if the kitchen is worn beyond repair, it's probably easier to rip it out and start over.  Case in point...my kitchen, built in the 60's, which we tried to update a few years ago but is now at the stage where it will be easier to rip it out and start over.
  • image wawajeanne:

    I think we need to make a distinction between off-trend and dated.

    Something can be "not hot" right now without looking dated. 

    Example: white cabinets might not be "in" at the moment for the leading edge, but that in no way makes them dated.

    But honey oak cabinets are both off-trend AND dated. 

    Similar - I will argue till I'm blue in the face that white appliances are not dated.  Off trend?  Absolutely.  But not dated.  Almond appliances on the other hand - those suckers are dated.

    And now the word dated sounds like nonsense.  I've said it too many times in my head.  dated, dated, dated...

    We should make a siggy badge or something lol.  

    I agree with you on white appliances, and I think black are a safe bet as well.  (And I've long said both on this board.)  In fact, the almond fridge in one of our houses has finally! kicked the bucket and I'm replacing it with a black counter-depth one, not SS, bc I really feel it suits the house better.  I plan to pick up a year or two old black fridge for a fraction of its retail price on CL from an idiot selling it to go buy a SS one.

    Let's do be clear that I was NOT saying that white cabinets are dated. 

  • image Bluesmoothy:

    That kitchen is gorgeous and I don't see how it could ever go out of style. It's classic.

    I agree.
    image
  • image wawajeanne:

    I think we need to make a distinction between off-trend and dated.

    Something can be "not hot" right now without looking dated. 

    Example: white cabinets might not be "in" at the moment for the leading edge, but that in no way makes them dated.

    But honey oak cabinets are both off-trend AND dated. 

    Similar - I will argue till I'm blue in the face that white appliances are not dated.  Off trend?  Absolutely.  But not dated.  Almond appliances on the other hand - those suckers are dated.

    And now the word dated sounds like nonsense.  I've said it too many times in my head.  dated, dated, dated...

    ITA. Our house had brand new white appliances when we bought it. They certainly aren't dated, they just might not be everyone's taste. I personally think that really entry-level SS appliances look cheaper and crappier than my white ones.

    image image image
  • I don't understand how white cabinets are considered off trend. I look through a ton of home decor mags and mags like Good Housekeeping every week and I see them in all of the upscale kitchens. Maybe this is just a Nest thing?
  • image Bluesmoothy:
    I don't understand how white cabinets are considered off trend. I look through a ton of home decor mags and mags like Good Housekeeping every week and I see them in all of the upscale kitchens. Maybe this is just a Nest thing?

    If you're talking about my post, go back and re-read.  I didn't say they were dated and I didn't say they were off-trend.  I did say high-end designers are probably through with them.  It is a design fact that by the time a trend makes it to Home Depot & Lowe's, high-end designers have already moved on. 

    Good Housekeeping's a great magazine, but it's not cutting edge, it's not what's next.  It shows what's now because that's what its readers want to see.  And white cabinets are very now.   

    One of the leading designers in kitchens is Christopher Peacock.  5 years ago, the ONLY thing his website showed was white kitchens, white kitchens, white kitchens.  What's there now?  Gray painted cabinets and medium-dark wood.  And there are some white kitchens in there, because they're a great choice.  But they aren't what's next.

    While this is silly to say, I wish I could be on the nest when the pendulum swings back to wood cabinets because most people on here are going to be ripping out their white cabinets (that have become what honey oak is today) and SS appliances to put in whatever's new and now. 

    It is NOT, emphatically not I say, that there is anything wrong with white cabinets or wood cabinets or laminate cabinets, it's just that styles change so quickly, nothing stays in style terribly long.  

    People say, "oh, subway tile's classic."  Utter nonsense.  Subway tile was big in the 1910s and was out of style from some time after that until some time recently.  All that time in the middle, we were doing '50s Mamie pink tile and '60s avocado Moroccan-shaped tiles and '80s country blue tile....

    Do you understand what I'm saying?  There's nothing wrong with any time period's choices - you just have to understand that they are that time's choice.   To say that any design look can last a lifetime is nonsense.  Styles change.  And young homeowners often don't get this, but if your grandmother's into decor, go ask her how many different kitchen and bath styles she's seen.  Almost every decade has its own look, hence my original answer of 15 years to update a kitchen.

  • There are some choices that will give you more flexibility.

    We looked into building a tract home. The main deal breaker for me? The kitchen cabinet options. Seriously. They were all very in line with what is trendy now, but I feel like stain choices and the door styles would quickly be dated. I wanted white. They said no can do. We ended up walking away.

    I don't think that white cabinets are always "in" but I think they're fairly neutral, especially if you stick with a door style with clean lines.

    Flooring, countertops, hardware, and backsplashes will date a home. Our tile and countertops are original to the house and you can tell. It's very 90's.

    My goal is to make choices that may go out of style, but won't neccessarily be outdated. I have no desire to ever keep up with trends.

    My husband wants a red washer and dryer. I told him that's our generations version of harvest gold.

  • I agree with Wawa and TH&R!  Everything will look dated at some point.  The question is: Is that a date you like? 

    With our home we're attempting to make it feel older than it really is and make it a craftsman style.  We love homes from that era and it's dated but in a good way.  Shaker style stained wood cabinets throughout the house for example.  That door style isn't going out of style anytime soon.  The color of stain/paint varies but good quality wood cabinets will never go out of style in my opinion.  So for our bathroom remodels for example we're going with a solid walnut vanity and linen cabinet in the main bathroom and solid cherry vanities and linen cabinets in the master bathroom.  Both will be solid wood with simply a clear coat on them (no stain).  We're mixing these traditional wood cabinets with a mostly white or cream bathroom.  Similarly with the HW floors we're installing in the rest of the house.  Dark stained wood is very "in" right now but we're going with at lighter natural hickory floors (solid 3/4") which have a mix of colors with the heartwood and sapwood that has a clear coat on top.  It's beautiful wood and though it isn't the trendiest color I can't see any future buyer walking into our house and saying they hate the floors.  Besides it could always be sanded down and stained a different color if they so desired.  That is the benefit of real wood not engineered or laminate.  The same can be done with cabinets if they are solid wood. 

    Door style I think is one of the biggest factors for how dated a kitchen looks.  People take honey oak cabinets and paint them all the time.  If the door style is classic enough it looks great.  If it's the arched top style that was posted about the other day painting won't help much.  

    Of the pictures you posted I would think the two toned cabinets and the corbels would date that kitchen the most. 

  • That is a beautiful kitchen. My opinion: Unless you're planning on moving anytime in the next 5-10 years, do what YOU want. We're doing our kitchen in 2 years, but I have no idea what we're going to do. All I know is I want unfinished cabinets, so that over time we can repaint/restain if we want to change colors. We do have white (laminated( cabinets right now and honestly, I hate the white. It shows every bit of dirt and grease.
    Wife. MoM {1G + BBG triplets}. DIY'er. Cloth Diaper'er.
  • image FoxinFiji:

    Of the pictures you posted I would think the two toned cabinets and the corbels would date that kitchen the most. 

    Agreed. That is definitely not a "timeless" kitchen, IMO. I actually find it hideous and ostentatious; it looks like something one of the Real Housewives of New Jersey would choose. 

    [IMG]http://i48.tinypic.com/35jeero.jpg[/IMG]
  • You just need to pick what YOU really love. It is YOUR house and YOUR kitchen. 
  • Thank you all for the feedback. I plan on checking a cabinet place in 2 weeks. I'm not sure yet what color/s I want. I admit though that I would want the kitchen to look extravagant. lol. Wink
  • Do you really want to keep up with the trends?  If so - then every 10 years you need to do some kind of updating.  Color choices, appliances etc. and cabinets counters will change.  It gets expensive. As much as possible  I would try to go timeless with choices and stay away from trendy with fixed items and only hange out colors and accessories.
  • image CatBus:
    image FoxinFiji:

    Of the pictures you posted I would think the two toned cabinets and the corbels would date that kitchen the most. 

    Agreed. That is definitely not a "timeless" kitchen, IMO. I actually find it hideous and ostentatious; it looks like something one of the Real Housewives of New Jersey would choose. 

     

    Haha.....you know nothing about classic kitchens then.

  • image Sisugal:
    Do you really want to keep up with the trends?  If so - then every 10 years you need to do some kind of updating.  Color choices, appliances etc. and cabinets counters will change.  It gets expensive. As much as possible  I would try to go timeless with choices and stay away from trendy with fixed items and only hange out colors and accessories.

    So what are timeless choices?

  • image d0ri:

    image Sisugal:
    Do you really want to keep up with the trends?  If so - then every 10 years you need to do some kind of updating.  Color choices, appliances etc. and cabinets counters will change.  It gets expensive. As much as possible  I would try to go timeless with choices and stay away from trendy with fixed items and only hange out colors and accessories.

    So what are timeless choices?

    That's the thing: there's no such thing as timeless kitchen choices!

    The best you can hope for is something that won't look, to use the vocab from this thread, off-trend or dated too quickly.  Everything will at some point.  Back in my original post, I said square-paneled cabinets and solid-colored countertops were good bets.  After that, all we can tell you is to choose good quality materials that you love.

    You said above that you wanted an "extravagant" kitchen and you've chosen this very ornate inspiration picture.  Those two factors don't lend themselves to the sort of quiet elements that can last 12-16-18 years instead of 10-12.  So if you really love the ornate kitchen you've posted, do it, but keep in mind that its corbels and ogee edge and two-toned cabinets and glazed bisque finish and varying cabinet heights make it very trendy and trends pass quickly. 

    And I'll tell you this and do with it what you will: in 2007, I lived in a home built in 2004.  That home came with bisque cabinets with a dark glaze.  Many homes in the neighborhood had the same bisque glazed cabinets.  My kitchen didn't have corbels and it didn't have a black island, but others did.  So I'm telling you, before you spend 5 figures on cabinets, that the design elements of your inspiration kitchen were making it into new construction homes in 2004.  If you love it, do it; if you doubts, this is a good point to reconsider.

  • image Bluesmoothy:
    image CatBus:
    image FoxinFiji:

    Of the pictures you posted I would think the two toned cabinets and the corbels would date that kitchen the most. 

    Agreed. That is definitely not a "timeless" kitchen, IMO. I actually find it hideous and ostentatious; it looks like something one of the Real Housewives of New Jersey would choose. 

     

    Haha.....you know nothing about classic kitchens then.

    Hmm This kitchen isn't "classic." I agree with TH&R that there is no truly "classic" kitchen, but there are kitchen styles that aren't as trendy and as quickly dated. This design is not one of them. It screams mid-'00s to me; it's the kitchen of upper-middle class suburbanites, thus the Real Housewives reference. Plus, I think the scale's way off.

    [IMG]http://i48.tinypic.com/35jeero.jpg[/IMG]
  • image TarHeels&Rebels:

    That's the thing: there's no such thing as timeless kitchen choices!

    The best you can hope for is something that won't look, to use the vocab from this thread, off-trend or dated too quickly.  Everything will at some point.  Back in my original post, I said square-paneled cabinets and solid-colored countertops were good bets.  After that, all we can tell you is to choose good quality materials that you love.

    You said above that you wanted an "extravagant" kitchen and you've chosen this very ornate inspiration picture.  Those two factors don't lend themselves to the sort of quiet elements that can last 12-16-18 years instead of 10-12.  So if you really love the ornate kitchen you've posted, do it, but keep in mind that its corbels and ogee edge and two-toned cabinets and glazed bisque finish and varying cabinet heights make it very trendy and trends pass quickly. 

    And I'll tell you this and do with it what you will: in 2007, I lived in a home built in 2004.  That home came with bisque cabinets with a dark glaze.  Many homes in the neighborhood had the same bisque glazed cabinets.  My kitchen didn't have corbels and it didn't have a black island, but others did.  So I'm telling you, before you spend 5 figures on cabinets, that the design elements of your inspiration kitchen were making it into new construction homes in 2004.  If you love it, do it; if you doubts, this is a good point to reconsider.

    Thanks for the input.  I'll definitely keep your suggestions in mind.  I'm not sure if the cabinet place I'm checking will be able to help me on the selection process.  I may have to hire an interior designer to guide me through.

  • image CatBus:

    Hmm This kitchen isn't "classic." I agree with TH&R that there is no truly "classic" kitchen, but there are kitchen styles that aren't as trendy and as quickly dated. This design is not one of them. It screams mid-'00s to me; it's the kitchen of upper-middle class suburbanites, thus the Real Housewives reference. Plus, I think the scale's way off.

    What did you mean by scale's way off?

  • image d0ri:
    image CatBus:

    Hmm This kitchen isn't "classic." I agree with TH&R that there is no truly "classic" kitchen, but there are kitchen styles that aren't as trendy and as quickly dated. This design is not one of them. It screams mid-'00s to me; it's the kitchen of upper-middle class suburbanites, thus the Real Housewives reference. Plus, I think the scale's way off.

    What did you mean by scale's way off?

    "Scale" actually wasn't quite the right term. Everything just looks so oversized, but the room is large, so it's not really the scale, per se, that's off. It's just way too big for my taste. I don't see a nice, efficient work triangle, either. It just doesn't look like a cook's kitchen to me. I would find it completely impractical.

    [IMG]http://i48.tinypic.com/35jeero.jpg[/IMG]
  • I didn't read all the responses, but I think the only way something will not look dated quickly is to do something that's somewhat unusual and was never really "in" in the first place. That can be hard, though. And it's likely very personal, so might not please everyone. Even then, it's going to look dated eventually.

    http://www.designtrackmind.com/2010/05/kitchens-with-character.html

     

  • I think there are both classic and trendy elements to that kitchen.  So not knowing which elements are inspiring you, it's hard to say how your kitchen will work in 5, 10, 15 years. 

    I think the cabinets in this kitchen are mostly classic, with the white color and shaker style straight lines and moulding.  The hardwood floor color is not too light or too dark.  I think people will always like islands or bars, so you have a good layout and the basic elements that will last.

    What I think could be potentially dated are:  Some of the wood detail work, such as the sconces on the sides of the range and the bases of the cabinets.  And the granite, though it's a nice neutral color.  I also think having different colors for the island and the cabinets will go out of style.

    I understand what someone is saying about this looking like a Real Housewives kitchen.  This kitchen is very typical of what I see in my area in the McMansion neighborhoods, and I look to those to see what is trendy.  This is a nicer version, but the similar idea of a huge kitchen with huge island, sink with one basin, pendent lights, granite, huge cabinets, etc.

    And isn't this kitchen yellow....which everyone was saying in that other post was completely dated.

Sign In or Register to comment.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards