Married Life

What should I expect at a Catholic funeral?

Besides the obvious.  I'm going to a funeral in the morning.  I have only been to 1 Catholic funeral before and that was when I wa a teen.  I accidently ended up getting Communion because my entire row stoold up and I followed them.

Are they usually long (the family is religious)?  Will the body be displayed? I really don't know what to expect. 

image

Re: What should I expect at a Catholic funeral?

  • its going to be just like Sunday Mass

     

    prayer

    song

    family speaks

    prayer

    song

    communion

    prayer

    song

     

    image
  • It will be a full mass.  I would think the casket will be closed at this point.
  • It should be about an hour long and the casket is usually closed for the actual funeral in the church.  The day/night before they will have the rosary (like a wake or viewing) at the funeral home which is when the casket would be open.
    AlternaTickers - Cool, free Web tickers
  • the casket should be closed

    they usually have a viewing on a seperate day

    image
  • Today was the viewing but I didn't go to that.

    I'm not sure exactly what a mass entails, but I get the general idea now. 

    Will people think it's rude if I don't go up to get the communion?  I'm Jewish so it doesn't really mean anything to me, but I wouldn't be upset if I should do this either.  I don't think that anyone at the funeral knows I'm Jewish.

    image
  • image Karma1969:

    Today was the viewing but I didn't go to that.

    I'm not sure exactly what a mass entails, but I get the general idea now. 

    Will people think it's rude if I don't go up to get the communion?  I'm Jewish so it doesn't really mean anything to me, but I wouldn't be upset if I should do this either.  I don't think that anyone at the funeral knows I'm Jewish.

    Instead of taking communion get a blessing instead.

    ETA: Cross your arms at your chest when you go up there. They will know what to do. MH calls this "tapping out" lol. 

    Image and video hosting by TinyPic
  • There may or may not be alcohol afterward.
    image
    I bet her FUPA's name is Shane, like the gunslinger/drifter of literature.--HappyTummy
  • I'm catholic and never get the communion

    I never had my communion

    I just stay seated

     

    image
  • image Karma1969:

    Will people think it's rude if I don't go up to get the communion?  I'm Jewish so it doesn't really mean anything to me, but I wouldn't be upset if I should do this either.  I don't think that anyone at the funeral knows I'm Jewish.

    Not at all.  I think devout Catholics would be offended if you took communion and weren't Catholic.  No harm in just sitting in the pew while others take communion.

    AlternaTickers - Cool, free Web tickers
  • image BobLoblaw:
    There may or may not be alcohol afterward.

    Catholics are totally down with the booze after funerals, weddings, baptisms, etc. 

    AlternaTickers - Cool, free Web tickers
  • If the wake is held in the church before the mass, the casket may or may not be open and it's placement will depend on the layout of the church.   

    If the wake is held at a funeral home the night before or the morning of the funeral, there will be a ceremony at the entrance to the church where the casket is covered in a cloth (the name is escaping me now, but it's usually got a cross on it) and is blessed.  The family and the celebrant then process up the aisle to begin the mass.

    There will be an entrance hymn, a welcoming prayer, sometimes the eulogy is put after the welcome, then another prayer. There is a reading from the bible, a responsorial pslam which is usually sung, and there might be a second reading from the bible. (The first is usually Old Testament, the 2nd if used is usually New), then the Gospel Acclamation and the Gospel. 

    Then there is the prayer of the faithful, communion, (sometimes the eulogy is after communion - it depends on the church and the celebrant), then a final prayer and the recession.  Right before the final prayers, the priest usually announces the place of burial and if the interment is private or not.  

     Somewhere in there, I think before communion, they bless the casket again, with incense.  I can't stand the smell of incense, it always makes me feel sick, so I try to sit as far from the casket as possible without looking like I don't want to be there.  

     

  • 1. Don't go up for communion.  You can just stay seated or rise to let others past you.   If you really want, you could do a blessing, but I dont' see that done often. dh and many relatives of mine just stay seated.  (technically, Catholics aren't even supposed to receive Communion if they haven't gone to Confession in awhile, but i think most don't follow that.)

    2.  Generally: Immediate family privately meets at the funeral home the morning before to say final farewells.  The rest go to the church for the funeral, no stop at funeral home. Casket and immediate family process in.  Mass ensues - much sit/stand/kneel rinse and repeat. Prayers of the Faithful are often done by a family member and somewhat personalized to that person's life.  Sermon by the priest, lots of incense blessing the casket.  Communion is after, I believe.  (Can't remember if before or after the incense)  Processional out (Casket, followed by grieving immediate family).    

    Often there's a wake, or a gathering with food after, usually in a church hall nearby or attached to the church.  Usually provided by volunteers from the church, and if it's a Polish area, kielbasa and german potato salad. ;)  

    There used to be more of a graveside either before or after the wake, but that's started to be discouraged to reduce chances of road accidents w/ long processions. Things kind of dissipate after that usually, at least for not the immediate family.   Immediate family sometimes gathers after. 

     

    Note:  while detailed, these are just the fresh in my mind details from the oh too many Catholic funerals I've been to this year.   Bear in mind as well, mine are all quite Polish, so there may be different traditions.  I think it's quite different than the Jewish traditions, though, from what I remember hearing from roommates and colleagues at the camp where I worked (a Jewish camp)

    image
    oh so helpful

    Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker


Sign In or Register to comment.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards