Green Living

Any CFLs made in the USA?

I admit I haven't done my research (that's what y'all are for, right?) Wink but I tried to buy some at Costco this weekend and they were all Made in China. 
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Re: Any CFLs made in the USA?

  • According to a post on another message board, these are:

    http://www.lightsofamerica.com/

    But...I don't see anything on the site saying the bulbs are actually made in the USA (could be that I didn't look hard enough, or it could be that they are merely a US-based company).  I also found other sites saying that due to the mercury and our environmental laws, they can't be produced here.  None of these are "good" sources, BTW...just sharing my quick Google process.  :-)

    I'm starting to think I should research LED bulbs and their cost/lifespan/environmental impact...

  • I work for a lighting company, and there are no CFL manufacturing plants in the US - we used to have one, but closed it about six years ago, because it wasn't competitive with the Chinese manufacturing companies that were flooding the market.  Our Asian division makes our CFL products ...
  • I haven't heard or seen any CFL bulbs being made in the U.S.  While I think any technology that reduces energy usage is a good one, I hope some other type of bulb comes along like LED.  The fact that manufacturing CFLs is so hazardous you can't do it in the U.S. is scary, plus I've always wondered what I'm supposed to do if I break one.  The CFLs we have are a bright artifical white that I'm not found of, and they take half a second to come on which also bothers me.  Plus I haven't yet found a wattage low enough for cadelabra bulbs, so we still have incandescents in our dining room chandelier.

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  • Thanks for the info, ladies.  Our friend installs LEDs at clubs, businesses, landscaping, etc. so I'll have to ask him more about them for home use. 
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  • Interesting to know.  The mercury in CFLs really bothers me.  I don't necessarily find their lifespan to be as good as claimed either. 

    DH really likes the idea of LED bulbs.  He bought one a few years ago that was useless.  The light it cast was dim, tinted blue, and highly directional despite the diffuser.  However, he's happier with the one he bought last week and says it will be good enough for his office.

  • image hkaszuba:
    I work for a lighting company, and there are no CFL manufacturing plants in the US - we used to have one, but closed it about six years ago, because it wasn't competitive with the Chinese manufacturing companies that were flooding the market.  Our Asian division makes our CFL products ...

    Try Ikea for the low wattage ones.  I bought some candelabra CFLs from them and they were actually too dim for our dining room.  I found brighter ones at Lowe's, but I haven't bought them yet because I just got done with putting in CFLs and LEDs ($$$) everywhere in our new house.  I don't remember the wattage on any of them, but I know the Ikea ones were the lowest of all. 

     

  • image CutesBoots:

    Interesting to know.  The mercury in CFLs really bothers me.  I don't necessarily find their lifespan to be as good as claimed either. 

    DH really likes the idea of LED bulbs.  He bought one a few years ago that was useless.  The light it cast was dim, tinted blue, and highly directional despite the diffuser.  However, he's happier with the one he bought last week and says it will be good enough for his office.

    CFL's do have mercury as do fluorescent bulbls ... both can be recycled.  Incandescents contain lead, so not all that EF either. 

    I'm actually a LED product manager - LEDs are more EF as pretty much everyone follows European RoHS (reduction of hazardous substances) standards - so no mercury, lead, etc.  The price is still relatively high, but the output of light and cost is dropping quickly; I think the price/performance will make sense for "the average consumer" in two to three years - and they last 50,000+ hours (as opposed to 1,500 to 3,000 for incandescent and 8,000 to 12,000 for CFL)

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