Austin Nesties
Dear Community,

Our tech team has launched updates to The Nest today. As a result of these updates, members of the Nest Community will need to change their password in order to continue participating in the community. In addition, The Nest community member's avatars will be replaced with generic default avatars. If you wish to revert to your original avatar, you will need to re-upload it via The Nest.

If you have questions about this, please email [email protected]

Thank you.

Note: This only affects The Nest's community members and will not affect members on The Bump or The Knot.

Newly required Bible history and literature??

http://www.statesman.com/ap/mediahub/media/slideshow/index.jsp?tId=173507

 

What is this about?? Are they talking about public schools, as in high school/jr high/elementary? 

This is the first I've heard anything about this, which may be because I don't usually pay much attention. But it seems like the sort of thing that would be talked about.

Can anybody clue me in?

Re: Newly required Bible history and literature??

  • This article explains a bit more.  I'm surprised this hasn't been talked about too!  This is the first I've heard of it too.  Now, granted, we live in DC, but this is exactly the kind of thing you'd think national news and pundits would be all over.
    Lilypie Fifth Birthday tickersLilypie Third Birthday tickers
  • Holy moly, I do not like that ONE BIT.

    I do see the value in offering that kind of class as an elective, but a requirement?? How can they say it doesn't promote christianity?? Are they going to add the Torah and the Qu'ran next?

     

    Man, we're really going to have to start saving for private school now. Sad

  • I don't think this is saying that all kids have to take a Bible class. From what I read when this passed the Legislature, what they're talking about is that schools offering this Bible class (which is an elective) have to teach the class in a certain way.

    Basically, it's supposed to be more academic and about the Bible's place in history and culture. But the state didn't offer the funding that schools might need to get the right training and course materials, so some schools that might have considered this class can't meet the state's requirements and won't have it. Those schools are trying to say that they meet the requirement for offering some kind of Bible instruction through what's already taught in history/geography classes.

    I do kinda hate this state for even making laws on this kinda stuff. But it's not like Sunday school or anything...yet.

  • image m_and_m:

    Holy moly, I do not like that ONE BIT.

    I do see the value in offering that kind of class as an elective, but a requirement?? How can they say it doesn't promote christianity?? Are they going to add the Torah and the Qu'ran next?

     

    Man, we're really going to have to start saving for private school now. Sad

    I can see how it doesn't (or at least doesn't have to) promote Christianity.  After all, there are plenty of universities that offer a Bible-as-literature course of some sort.  Those classes manage to teach Biblical writings in an objective way, and I'm sure the same could be done at the high school level.

    If the state is going to require schools to offer such a class, however, then the state should fund the training for it.  And if they can't or don't want to, then they shouldn't require schools to offer the class.

    I actually think they should include writings from the Qu'ran, the Apocrypha, and other sacred texts.  (Pretty sure the Torah will be included as part of the standard Christian Bible).  If our children wanted to take a class in sacred texts as literature, then I'd want them exposed to material representing all religions, not just the Bible.

    Lilypie Fifth Birthday tickersLilypie Third Birthday tickers
  • I had not heard of this, but I think it would be a valuable elective from an educational standpoint. As long as the course is taught in an objective and non-devotional manner (as in a college religious studies course), this kind of elective could be good preparation for humanities classes. It is an unavoidable fact that a high percentage of the classics of western (i.e. European and North American) art, music, and literature has a basis in the Bible.

    As an example of how this could be useful, consider Michelangelo's David, arguably one of the most famous sculptures in the world. My art history students love studying this work, but I often have to explain the entire Biblical story of David and Goliath in order for students to understand it. It's kind of a waste of my teaching time, to tell you the truth, because then I'm just talking about the subject matter of the work. If a student already knows the story, which is one of the best-known from the Old Testament, then that allows them to approach the sculpture of David from a much more advanced level. 

    I teach non-western art as well and also include the religious contexts. In my case, my students need to know or learn a little about the Bible in the same way they need to know a little about Greek and Roman mythology, the Tao Te Ching, the Upanishads, Mayan cosmology, etc. There is no hierarchy.

    Business Cat. image
  • image Kinks:

    I don't think this is saying that all kids have to take a Bible class. From what I read when this passed the Legislature, what they're talking about is that schools offering this Bible class (which is an elective) have to teach the class in a certain way.

     

    Okay this I don't take issue with. I do see the benefit of a Bible/Lit class (even my sinful non-christian self took one once), it's just not something I agree with being mandatory.

  • I think it's awesome that they're offering it in high schools now! That's something I'd love to teach someday. The way I'm reading it though, it's an elective class and it's not mandatory that students take it. I found this article that explains a little bit more about the legislation.
  • image batsteph:

    I actually think they should include writings from the Qu'ran, the Apocrypha, and other sacred texts.  (Pretty sure the Torah will be included as part of the standard Christian Bible).  If our children wanted to take a class in sacred texts as literature, then I'd want them exposed to material representing all religions, not just the Bible.

    I would not mind if this kind of class were mandatory. It could be a combo history / literature class.  

    Business Cat. image
  • image AustinMimi:
    image batsteph:

    I actually think they should include writings from the Qu'ran, the Apocrypha, and other sacred texts.  (Pretty sure the Torah will be included as part of the standard Christian Bible).  If our children wanted to take a class in sacred texts as literature, then I'd want them exposed to material representing all religions, not just the Bible.

    I would not mind if this kind of class were mandatory. It could be a combo history / literature class.  

    I agree.  It would be great college prep.  From what I remember, subjects were taught in something of a vacuum in high school:  We only discussed history in history class, we only discussed literature in English class, etc.  Not at all like college-level classes.  A high school class that required students to synthesize their knowledge of art/history/literature/sociology/etc. would be valuable as a pre-college experience.

    Lilypie Fifth Birthday tickersLilypie Third Birthday tickers
  • Now, can we somehow get you on the board to write curriculum for these classes? ?This kind of class would be a godsend (pardon the pun) for humanities, but I have a feeling that unfortunately it won't resemble this angle of approach. ??

    image AustinMimi:

    I had not heard of this, but I think it would be a valuable elective from an educational standpoint. As long as the course is taught in an objective and non-devotional manner (as in a college religious studies course), this kind of elective could be good preparation for humanities classes. It is an unavoidable fact that a high percentage of the classics of western (i.e. European and North American) art, music, and literature has a basis in the Bible.

    As an example of how this could be useful, consider Michelangelo's David, arguably one of the most famous sculptures in the world. My art history students love studying this work, but I often have to explain the entire Biblical story of David and Goliath in order for students to understand it. It's kind of a waste of my teaching time, to tell you the truth, because then I'm just talking about the subject matter of the work. If a student already knows the story, which is one of the best-known from the Old Testament, then that allows them to approach the sculpture of David from a much more advanced level.?

    I teach non-western art as well and also include the religious contexts. In my case, my students need to know or learn a little about the Bible in the same way they need to know a little about Greek and Roman mythology, the Tao Te Ching, the Upanishads, Mayan cosmology, etc. There is no hierarchy.

  • I think it's requiring schools to offer it as an elective, not as a required course.
  • I just read the article from the Statesman and I'm so not ok with this.  It's this line here from the article that I don't quite understand:

    All Texas public school districts for the first time this fall must offer instruction in the literature and history of the Bible under the 2007 law.

    Why was this made into a law? Why do public school districts have to offer instruction re: literature and history of the Bible but not of other religions or religious texts?  With regard to the Bible, from what perspective will courses be taught? My assumption is from a Christian perspective, but portions of the Bible are shared by Christians, Jews, and Muslims, and each culture/religion uses the Bible in a way that impacts their literature and history.

    This was a bad move on the part of the Texas school board and I don't think this should have ever been mandated.

    (Sorry to have offended anyone, but this is a hot issue for me.)

  • I am a devout Christian (ie - I attend church every Sunday, read the Bible regularly, etc) but I do not agree with adding Bible curriculum in public school, even as an elective. 

    I personally prefer to be the one to teach my child about the Bible how/if/when I chose to do so.  You never know what spin a teacher will put on the historical aspects of the Bible depending on their views/beliefs/interpretations.  The public school classroom really isn't the place to learn about the Bible.  I feel like that should be left up to the individual parents/churches - even if it is just being taught as a history lesson.  I just think there is too much room for things to be taught in a way that I do not agree with. 

    I understand the reasoning behind Bible history complimenting other areas of study and don't disagree with highlighting areas of the Bible in class when and if they apply historically to the lesson. 

    Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker
  • DH is a HS reading teacher in the DFW area and he just called me upon learning that Biblical Allusions is now part of TEKS, which sounds like it's required across subjects and not just for a separate class.  He was pretty upset about it but he's going to find out more.

    He agrees along AustinMimi's points that the Bible (along with other religious texts) is important to know, but he doesn't think it should be required. I think it's okay, but I think it's wrong to have the TEKS limit it to the Bible and not expand it to include texts of other religions if they're going to make it a requirement.


    Help for Haiti: Learn What You Can Do

    BFP 12.20.2010 :: missed m/c 1/2011 around 8 weeks
    BFP @ 9dpo 5.24.2011 :: missed m/c 6/2011 around 7 weeks
    positive for ANAs (1:40) with a speckled pattern
    MTHFR c677t mutation (heterozygous)
    *folic acid, baby asprin, Prometrium, acupuncture, Lovenox*
    BFP @ 9dpo 2.1.2012 || HCG = 8 : Progesterone = 19.2
    2nd HCG @ 11dpo = 40 || 3rd HCG @ 21dpo = over 5000!
    Stick, little one, stick! EDD October 15, 2012
    image
Sign In or Register to comment.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards