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SPR: Ever use dry ice to keep ice cream/popsicles frozen at a picnic?

Will it really keep it from getting soft/melting?  Did you just layer it on the bottom or on the top as well?

 

I'm going to a memorial day barbeque/agilty games picnic and it is supposed to be hot!  Combine that with running around with dogs in the sun and I'm thinking that ice cream cups and fruity popsicles would be very welcome.  I'm just not sure if dry ice will really keep it frozen for hours on a very hot day.  Ever tried this?

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Re: SPR: Ever use dry ice to keep ice cream/popsicles frozen at a picnic?

  • We brought back live lobsters from Maine using dry ice... I don't see a problem with it keeping your frozen goodies cold. 
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  • GBCKGBCK
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    Dry ice works fairly well for this.  How many hours are you talking? 

    And yes, layer it on the bottom--put the pieces in paper grocery bags and lay them across the bottom.  If they're the wrong size, it breaks w/ a hammer.

    Then put normal ice on top of that.  

     

    A few things to note:

    1-prolonged contact from dry icewill kill your cooler.  The plastics get to cold and break and then the foamy crap between the layers of cooler come out.

     2-it's a bad idea to keep it in something that 100% seals...it'll pop.  (so you can't keep it in a plastic ziploc

    3-don't let dumbasses (or dogs) eat it.  Frostbite on the esophogus because it's -110 and sublimation so it inflates the tummy?  yeah-not so fun.   Technically, yoiu're not supposed to touch it w/o gloves on but quite honestly it's only prolonged contact w/o gloves that causes problems

  • When I have my groceries delivered they put dry ice in with the frozen foods.  It works pretty well for the most part.  The only time it failed me was when they delivered my groceries a lot earlier than anticipated so my ice cream got kind of melty and then re-froze when I put it in the freezer so it had a funky consistancy.  For a couple hours for popsicles and ice cream cups though I would think it will be ok.
  • image GBCK:
    Dry ice works fairly well for this.  How many hours are you talking? 

    And yes, layer it on the bottom--put the pieces in paper grocery bags and lay them across the bottom.  If they're the wrong size, it breaks w/ a hammer.

    Then put normal ice on top of that. 

    Probably about six or so hours because I have to travel there in the morning, and it probably won't be eaten till early to mid afternoon.  I'm glad to hear that someone else thinks it should work though. 

     

    I used to work with dry ice on a daily basis in the lab because most of my work needed to be done at -78 oC or quenched over dry ice to prevent spontaneous combustion from contact with air (although a little bit of pink fire can be fun Devil).    I saw how much things like moisture and insulation could affect it's cooling power which made me wonder if it would truly work in a cooler.  I mean just looking at the numbers you would think it would have to, but then there are so many other things to factor in!

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  • People have actually eaten dry ice?  I was sufficiently spooked by a chem teacher to be extremely careful with it.  I have never once thought about eating it.
    A big old middle finger to you, stupid Nest.
  • image pixy_stix:
    People have actually eaten dry ice?  I was sufficiently spooked by a chem teacher to be extremely careful with it.  I have never once thought about eating it.

     

    LOL  I had just the opposite experience.  One of my inorganic chem professors in undergrad decided to show us just how 'harmless' the stuff is by taking a piece, crunching it in his teeth and then spitting out the bits.  Indifferent  He was a bit nuts though and eventually left the department......I would not recommend doing that.  Wink

     

    I have a healthy respect for it, but used to pick up pieces with my hands all the time with no problem.  Same goes for liquid nitrogen.  I had some poured on my hand with no problem at all.  It's when you enclose it that thing go bad very fast.

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  • At Penn State, if you buy ice cream at their creamery, they ask you how far you are traveling, and then they pack your ice cream with the appropriate amount of dry ice (1 brick for 2 hours or something). ?Their dry ice was in those padded mailing containers. ?Works great!

    To save your cooler, I would just put it in a cardboard box or a junky styrofoam box if you have one (or a disposable cooler). ?Everything we would ship would be fine in/on dry ice within a styrofoam box inside a cardboard box. ??

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  • It should be fine, dry ice is great for lots of things and everything in lab gets shipped with dry ice.  I would just make sure you have a layer between the dry ice and the food.
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  • we used dry ice to keep ice cream treats frozen when it was our turn to bring snacks to SD's soccer game.  worked perfectly.  we just put some on the bottom.  i don't remember adding regular ice, too, but couldn't hurt.
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