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Do I write a resignation letter?

I am currently a teacher and have worked at my school finishing up my second year.  I just found out that I will be moving across the country this summer because of a job my husband got.  I want to tell my boss this week so I do not have to worry about hiding the fact that I will be leaving.  I will be finishing out the school year but obviously not returning next school year.  I am afraid she will not take this very well (she has a history of this). 

Also a side note, all teachers in my district are yearly contracts so technically on paper I am only employed until June until they ask me back in May.  So here is my question, do I meet with my principal and just let her know I will not be coming back, or should I talk to her and also write a resignation letter?  I haven't ever had to write one before and I want to go about this in the most respectful way.  Any advice is appreciated.

Also if you really want to help me out:  I need to start looking at jobs where we are going to move and I already see a few positions I can apply to.  When should I ask my boss for a letter of recommendation, or from other employees that I work with that I was planning on asking.  Is there a respectable time to wait?

Re: Do I write a resignation letter?

  • Normally I would say wait 4-6 weeks but, since you need some recommendations letters now in order to apply for new positions, I would talk to the principal now.  Hopefully she will be more understanding than she has been in the past, since you are leaving due to moving to another area rather than leaving because you took a job at a school across town or something.

    Resignation letters are fairly simple.  Do a google search for templates.  In a nutshell, it will include your regrets, your thanks, and the specifics of when you're leaving.

    In the same conversation you are telling your boss you are leaving, I would also ask for her a recommendation letter and explain you are already applying for positions in the hopes to have a job waiting in the fall.  After your boss knows, I'd then talk to whoever else you are going to ask for a letter.

    It might be different in your work culture, but I know most of the places I've worked the bosses expect employees to write their own recommendation letters.  Then send them the word file so they can add/subtract anything if they wish to.  Something to keep in mind or even offer to do, if appropriate for your workplace. 

    Hometomellc
  • Since you're in a contract position and teaching is so unique, I'd set a formal meeting now and have the conversation face to face, followed by something in writing copying the Board of Education office or your school's secretary.

    Also, I've never once heard the above of writing your own recommendation letter. I think if I was ever asked to do that, I'd be dumbfounded and would likely reconsider that person as a reference.
    HeartlandHustle | Personal Finance and Betterment Blog  
  • als1982 said:

    Since you're in a contract position and teaching is so unique, I'd set a formal meeting now and have the conversation face to face, followed by something in writing copying the Board of Education office or your school's secretary.

    Also, I've never once heard the above of writing your own recommendation letter. I think if I was ever asked to do that, I'd be dumbfounded and would likely reconsider that person as a reference.



    It sounded weird to me the first time I heard it, but I swear the last four places I've worked have all been like that.  I guess in some industries it is just the way it is done.  They were all engineering firms and a defense contractor.  Not saying I agree, but the thought process is that you are asking a former manager/coworker for a favor and so, in order to save them time, you write the meat of the letter yourself so they only have to add in a few personal touches.

    And, come to think of it, it was almost always suggested by the manager themselves.  Like, "Hey, Ms. B, would you mind writing me a reference letter." Answer: "Sure!  I'd love to.  But I'd appreciate it if you could write the letter and send it to me, to add to and sign."

    In all of those companies, we were also expected to write our own annual performance reviews.  It was kind of the same process.  You'd write your review, print it, and give it to your manager along with the word file.  The manager would then usually add a few of their own comments and perhaps change a "grade" up or down (thought not usually).  Then the process was a little more typical.  They'd print their final version, sign it, have a sit down with you, you'd sign it, and it went off to corporate.

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